How to have a safe Thanksgiving with this COVID-19 guidance from Kentucky officials

By | November 11, 2020

Thanksgiving is approaching and in Kentucky, state and health officials are sounding the alarm as the commonwealth continues to deal with another COVID-19 surge.The concern from Gov. Andy Beshear and other officials is that people gathered in close quarters — some of those people not immediate family members — will only add to the number of cases and people in hospitals with COVID-19.”We are seeing spread and we are seeing the resulting loss happening more at family and social gatherings than anywhere else right now,” said Beshear.Watch below: Kentucky officials discuss how to have a safe ThanksgivingHealth leaders are reminding people that the coronavirus spreads through droplets, which can be passed on between people through saliva, sneezing or eating. Thanksgiving and the holidays can be prime avenues of spread because people are inside longer and gathered with relatives who do not live with them at home.Beshear said the holiday can be “very dangerous” as the pandemic wages on, and as the state deals with another uptick due to people not adhering to mitigation measures.Still, Beshear wanted to remind people that it doesn’t mean Thanksgiving is canceled. Instead, he’s calling on people to do it differently to avoid spreading the disease to those who are most vulnerable, including elderly relatives.”This doesn’t mean anybody’s suggesting Thanksgiving’s canceled,” Beshear said. “Far from it. We ought to celebrate our blessings. We ought to be able to be in touch with each other through Zoom. But we ought to be thankful for having the knowledge of how to protect those around us.” The main takeaways include:Wearing masks or face coverings.Avoiding in-person gatherings with people who do not live in your household.Maintain adequate distance from people, including in public spaces.Avoid large gatherings, including those held indoors.Do not host or attend crowded parades.Avoid shopping in crowded stores.Beshear said all residents in red zones with significant community spread should pay particular attention to the Thanksgiving guidance. His red zone recommendations include moving schools back to virtual learning, canceling large outdoor events, working from home as much as possible and ordering takeout from restaurants.Check out the video to hear more about the Thanksgiving guidance.

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Thanksgiving is approaching and in Kentucky, state and health officials are sounding the alarm as the commonwealth continues to deal with another COVID-19 surge.

The concern from Gov. Andy Beshear and other officials is that people gathered in close quarters — some of those people not immediate family members — will only add to the number of cases and people in hospitals with COVID-19.

“We are seeing spread and we are seeing the resulting loss happening more at family and social gatherings than anywhere else right now,” said Beshear.

Watch below: Kentucky officials discuss how to have a safe Thanksgiving

Health leaders are reminding people that the coronavirus spreads through droplets, which can be passed on between people through saliva, sneezing or eating. Thanksgiving and the holidays can be prime avenues of spread because people are inside longer and gathered with relatives who do not live with them at home.

Beshear said the holiday can be “very dangerous” as the pandemic wages on, and as the state deals with another uptick due to people not adhering to mitigation measures.

Still, Beshear wanted to remind people that it doesn’t mean Thanksgiving is canceled. Instead, he’s calling on people to do it differently to avoid spreading the disease to those who are most vulnerable, including elderly relatives.

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“This doesn’t mean anybody’s suggesting Thanksgiving’s canceled,” Beshear said. “Far from it. We ought to celebrate our blessings. We ought to be able to be in touch with each other through Zoom. But we ought to be thankful for having the knowledge of how to protect those around us.”

The main takeaways include:

  • Wearing masks or face coverings.
  • Avoiding in-person gatherings with people who do not live in your household.
  • Maintain adequate distance from people, including in public spaces.
  • Avoid large gatherings, including those held indoors.
  • Do not host or attend crowded parades.
  • Avoid shopping in crowded stores.

Beshear said all residents in red zones with significant community spread should pay particular attention to the Thanksgiving guidance. His red zone recommendations include moving schools back to virtual learning, canceling large outdoor events, working from home as much as possible and ordering takeout from restaurants.

Check out the video to hear more about the Thanksgiving guidance.

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